CITYCONOMY: Service for your City Free Download

CITYCONOMY: Service for your City Free Download Repacklab


CITYCONOMY: Service for your City Free Download Repacklab Probably the best thing about Cityconomy, besides some of the ideas presented, is its actual world. Graphics aren’t mind-blowing, but the game looks and runs nicely. Animations are a little stocky, but mostly there, and the trucks look and function like real ones. The game engine feels like something out of the sixth generation of consoles; back then this would’ve been cutting-edge technology, but now it just feels janky and dated. Controller support is lacking, but a lot of detail went into operating these vehicles, so much so that turning on blinkers and getting tickets for hitting other drivers come into play (the latter being something that doesn’t happen often in video games, and is a nice touch.) SEXY GAMES

CITYCONOMY Service for your City Free Download Repacklab

You start the game as a bin man, who’s both manager and worker of a company of public services. You objective is simple: you have to drive your truck to the locations marked on your map and there, load the dumpsters onto the truck, unload the bin bags and put the dumpsters back where they were. Once your truck is full, you must empty it in the rubbish dump nearby, and then rinse and repeat. In the process, you can do exciting activities such as refuelling your fuel tank, or collecting more waste. If you feel bold, you can even break a red light. Well, maybe Cityconomy is not particularly fun. But put this way, most simulators are not fun at all. However, Cityconomy takes very menial, dull and repetitive activities that are at hand in everybody’s lives, and artificially turns them into a system of unlocks, rewards and progression.

Cityconomy Press Package

Cityconomy is not fully a simulator, and I say this with little contempt for its status. It includes a series of unlocks and rewards systems that are much more engaging than the core activities and that reflect a series of design trends which work only under very particular contexts. This may sound like a long-winded argument, but bear with me. As you earn more capital by spending an insane amount of time picking up rubbish, you will eventually be able to buy new trucks and expand your company into other areas such as plumbing, gardening or car towing. These activities allow you to have larger control of the city’s public services, and are, at large, a materialisation of the expected progression seen in plenty of games. Dreadlands 

CITYCONOMY Service for your City Free Download Repacklab

Here we have the capitalist representation of videogame mechanics, using money as a strangely meaningful goal. It is a near-endless ascension to the full control and total access to all resources (vehicles, workers, areas, etc.) that we see in pretty much all games where currency takes a part. From The Witcher 3 and Fallout 4 to The Sims and Invisible Inc. more money translates in more options to play around, more and better weapons, armours, even areas! The main difference is that in these games money takes a side role, and (most) missions can be completed without getting money for it, so it becomes more of a commodity than the primary goal of the game. More cash means more resources, but it doesn’t necessarily give you a better experience of the game, or it’s indicative of your performance. Missions in which money is the only reward can be considered a grind. What’s more, the lore and stories that they contain is usually more enticing than the money in the rewards.

Cityconomy – West EU + West Indies

If we look at some other games, like Rollercoaster Tycoon or Cities: Skylines, money becomes a primary objective. The more money you have, the bigger, more efficient and prettier your amusement park or city will be, and consequently, people will come swarming through the gates. So yes, these games do work in a very similar fashion as Cityconomy. However, there is a subtle difference that makes Cityconomy feel like the embodiment of capitalism and the American Dream; the idea that hard work will give you enough rewards – no matter what – that owning a corporation controlling all services of a city is accomplishable. All this boils down to the fact that you own the company and, at the same time, work your ass off in the most trivial jobs, such as collecting rubbish. The management of this company is just a tiny part of what you’ll be doing in Cityconomy, which makes it feel like having an actual job where the only purpose is earning money – but with more visible rewards, although less exciting. There is no room for an economic strategy for your company and no real advantages in taking over one service sector over another. Do Not Feed the Monkeys

CITYCONOMY Service for your City Free Download Repacklab

Those who like to wreak havoc in their open-world games won’t find much to do here; players are penalised for hitting cars or pedestrians, and physics don’t really exist; hitting trees or poles will just bring the truck to a stop (in one instance it glitched afterward and couldn’t be moved at all, forcing a reset of the game). Traffic laws are in place, and it turns out waiting in traffic is even less fun in a video game than in real life. There’s not much freedom in general; the game essentially forces players to play a single way: Drive to the next objective marker, get a quest from a random citizen (just like real life?), open the truck’s arms, guide trash bins into it, press a button on the side of a truck to dump the garbage, put the bin back, and repeat. This gameplay gets old fast, but players can manage other employees and have them perform certain jobs, all the while moving their business up in the world.

Time to clean up!

If this game were released in 2001, it would probably be hailed as one of the above-average games of the time period. By today’s standards, it’s a bit of a mess; no soundtrack, no physics, players are pigeonholed into playing a certain way, and things are just unpolished overall. That aside, it’s clear the team at Nano Games has originality and some good ideas, and where the game does work, it works well; in particular, the management features and driving mechanics. It has a severe lack of polish and freedom, however, which, on the whole, makes it feel less like playing a game and more like doing work, but it’ll be interesting to see what things this team can come up with and implement (hopefully better) in the future. Dead Rising 4

CITYCONOMY Service for your City Free Download Repacklab

Simulators are a strange breed. From Farming Simulators to Arma 3, there are plenty of slow-paced games that demand meticulous attention to every action. To a certain extent, one can understand why some of them are so popular. Flight simulators offer an opportunity to take up a role that otherwise would be near impossible in real life, not to mention its cost. Games like Rising Sun offer the challenge and severity of a real war without the death, massacre and gore that come with it. Even train simulators are a great option for train enthusiasts, which for some reason, there are plenty. But Cityconomy is even stranger than most other simulators. What’s more, its definition as a sim is loose and makes for some awkward moments when put in comparison to other games, to the point that it feels that it is trying to make a statement with its tedious gameplay. Dead Rising 2 Of The Record

Add-ons (DLC): CITYCONOMY: Service for your City

Cityconomy – West EU + West Indies Service for your City Cityconomy Press Package

Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Windows 7, 8, 10, 64-Bit
Processor: Dual-core Intel Core 2 Duo or Athlon 64 X2 processor with at least 2.4 GHz
Memory: 4 GB RAM
Graphics: DirectX 11-compatible graphics card (NVIDIA GeForce 4xx or AMD Radeon HD 57xx and better) with at least 1 GB VRAM
DirectX: Version 11
Network: Broadband Internet connection
Storage: 3,5 GB available space
Additional Notes: 32-bit operating systems are not supported

Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Windows 7, 8, 10, 64-Bit
Processor: Quad-core Intel Core i7 processor with 3.6 GHz or better
Memory: 6 GB RAM
Graphics: DirectX 11-compatible graphics card (NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 or better)
DirectX: Version 11
Network: Broadband Internet connection
Storage: 3,5 GB available space
Additional Notes: 32-bit operating systems are not supported